Training essentials for the first time runner

Training essentials for the first time runner

I love running. Outdoors in the wild, open spaces, whatever the weather. Sometimes it feels easy; I feel strong and it’s a good workout. Other times it’s tough, both physically and mentally challenging. Yet, all my runs are an adventure. They free my mind, improve my mood, energy, creativity and strength.

Whatever reason is compelling you to start running, I promise it will give you all you're looking for and more. It’s quick, easy and effective.  You can do it solo or join a club and make new friends.

Before you begin here are my 7 top tips to help you enjoy your running and stay injury free:

1. Pop down to a runner shop that offers a free gait analysis to get the most suitable pair of trainers for the way you run.

2. Whilst you are there, find a supportive sports bra.  Try several on and remember, they are designed to run in, not for everyday wear. Running bras support your bust, reducing pressure on your back. So they improve your posture, gait and enjoyment, whatever your bust size.

 Writing a small running plan

3. Write a small plan of what you want to achieve. Look online or ask a running club or coach to advise you. It’s best to start slow.  'Walk run', increasing your pace every week for 6 weeks. After 6 -12 weeks, depending on your fitness and confidence, you could try a free Park Run. Open to everyone, they’re friendly events and a lot of fun.

4. When you're running, remember to breathe. It sounds silly, but often we get tight in our shoulders and because it’s hard, we forget to breathe and relax. Focus on breathing in deeply, thinking of a mantra such as ‘I can do this.’ Breathe out any tension or tiredness. Be proud of what you achieve on every run and learn from the ones you don’t make.

5. Each week do a little core workout to help strengthen your body for running.

Kim’s core workout tip: Try this little routine: crunches, dorsal raises, side crunches, superman back alternatives, plank. 1-3 sets, 60 secs each.

6. Make a little time after your run or the next day to really stretch. If you find you get tight on the outside of the leg, from your hip to your knee, get yourself a foam roller. It’ll help reduce tightness in the muscles and fascia (where women tend to get tight due to their hip to knee angle). There are lots of Youtube videos that show you how to use a foam roller effectively. But if you’re unsure just tweet me. If you can, a 30 minute sports massage every three months will make a world of difference.

Making a little time after your run

7. Finally, remember to eat good, fresh food before and after your runs. And enjoy it with good company for ultimate relaxation. It’ll support your energy levels and fuel your runs. It also helps with muscle recovery. I genuinely believe Omega 3 is great for supporting your joint health and injury prevention too. So, unless your diet is super high in it, I would suggest a supplement. Also, if you tend to sweat a lot during your runs, try adding electrolytes to your water. You can find them in most health food stores. It’s a really good way to increase your hydration and replenish any lost minerals. But more than anything, make sure you plan some down time between your runs. It’s important if you feel injured that you don’t ignore your body. It’s best to ask for advice just to be on the safe side. 

Kim Ingleby has the passion and skills to help you achieve your goals. Following three years of complex neurological, brain and liver problems from Post Weils Encephalitis, Kim has mastered the art of achieving success against all odds. She’s featured on TEDx, sharing her expertise on how to overcome adversity and how to be brave.  She’s raised almost £80k for charity, coached Team GB, Body Confidence for Women and Strictly Come Dancing pros. Kim is a triple award winning personal trainer, DNAFit consultant, NLP confidence master coach and team GB’s sports therapist. 

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